Tim Day

Tim Day Portrait
Senior Vice President, C_TEC

As senior vice president of C_TEC (Chamber Technology Engagement Center) at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Tim Day highlights the role of technology in our economy and advocates for emerging technology. He is also responsible for championing rational policy solutions that spur innovation and create jobs.

Day has a proven track record of advancing important technology issues through the legislative process. He joined the Chamber from Teradata Corporation, where as vice president of government affairs he coordinated and developed public policy advocacy agendas and communicated with key federal, state, and international government decision makers.

Before Teradata, Day served as vice president of government affairs at NCR Corporation, was chief of staff to Congresswoman Deborah Pryce (R-OH), legislative director to Congressman David Hobson (R-OH), and legislative assistant to Congressman Joe Barton (R-TX). 

Day has extensive management experience in the federal government and high-tech government affairs. He has been a speaker at various seminars and symposiums on Capitol Hill, at state capitals, as well as at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Day earned a bachelor’s degree from Cedarville University in Ohio in 1987. He serves on the board of advisors for the Data Coalition, a Washington, D.C.-based coalition that advocates on behalf of the private sector and the public interest for publishing government information as standardized, machine-readable data. In 1998, Day was accepted as a delegate to the American Council of Young Political Leaders. He resides in Alexandria, Virginia.

Latest Content

The House of Representatives Hits the Ground Running on Innovation and Tech Legislation

The House passed bipartisan legislation that modernizes government and meets the needs of today’s innovation-driven economy.

Innovation- It’s Social, Local and Global and the Chamber’s C_TEC is Helping Lead the Way

Many of us have been in this situation: wanting to help a sick loved one from across the country or trying to consolidate medical records to help organize care.  Now, imagine a world where a self-driving car safely takes your relative to the emergency room when they are too sick to drive and artificial intelligence systems help document their symptoms to make a diagnosis before they’ve even seen a doctor. Meanwhile, wearable health monitors help track their recovery and update the physician and family.